6 Sex Positions For Tall Women Who Don’t Give AF About Dating Shorter Dudes

by | Apr 13, 2018

By national averages at least, I am tall: At roughly 5’9” I stand about six inches above the standard for women. This is not a bad thing—I can easily reach most of the shelves in my apartment and enjoy clomping around like a giant on those occasions when I choose to wear heels—nor does it even feel that tall. Maybe just tall enough that I empathise with the challenge of height differences in dating.

When you’re having penis-in-vagina sex, it can be tricky to maneuver when someone clocks in under or around your same height: If you’re into eye contact and forward-facing positions, for example, you might be disappointed to find a shorter-torso-having partner bumps up against your chin. When you’re riding on top, you might find you have to crane your neck way down to reach your partner’s face.

Luckily, as far as coital imbalances go, there are some easy fixes.

In general, the positions that seem best suited to partners with height differences, regardless of their genders, are those that don’t involve face-to-face contact and instead put your genitals on the same plane. So if you are a person who towers over your companion, here are six solutions to make sex a little less awkward.

1. Man’s Best Friend

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Women’s Health

Doggy style is a reliable classic that works well for people of different heights. You don’t have to worry about your faces not lining up the way you would if you settled into boring old missionary. Also, it frees up his hands to play with your nipples and clit, which is an excellent bonus. To get in position, simply kneel on all fours and have him enter you from behind, either standing or kneeling, whatever works best.

2. Upstanding Citizen

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Women’s Health

For this one, choose a surface that hits your partner at waist level. Perch yourself on that with your legs spread while he positions himself in front of you for standing sex that puts your pelvises on the same level.

3. Downward Dog

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Women’s Health

Lying face down, with a pillow under your pelvis or your butt pitched slightly in the air, have your partner thrust into you from behind. In downward dog, there’s excellent potential for G-spot stimulation, plus the added pressure that comes from your weight bearing down on your clit as you grind against the bed or a hand. And when you’re not trying to stare into one another’s eyes, it doesn’t matter that your torso is a little too long for that anyway.

4. Cross Buttocks

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Women’s Health

Although it may look somewhat difficult to execute, the cross buttocks is ideal for height-divergent couples because, with both of you horizontal and your faces at 90 degree angles to one another, the only thing that matters is PIV contact. (Also, ample opportunity to smack his ass.) Lie on your back and have him lie over you, across your waist, penetrating you from a sideways angle.

5. Seated Wheelbarrow

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Women’s Health

Here’s a sexy option that might also build arm muscle, if you’re into that sort of thing: The seated wheelbarrow, which renders your heights irrelevant. Have your dude sit on the edge of a sturdy surface and position yourself so that you’re ass-up in his lap, with your hands planted firmly on the floor. Stretch your legs out behind his waist (it’ll probably work better if he supports your thighs) and pump away.

6. Spider

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Women’s Health

The spider has both of you reclining away from one another, mitigating any vertical distance that might typically separate your faces; as in cross buttocks, the only thing that matters here is your genital apex. Facing one another and seated crotch-to-crotch, sling your legs over your partner’s so that both of you have your soles rooted to the floor. Leaning back on your elbows, have him enter you and thrust from this laid-back position.

This article originally appeared on Women’s Health US

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Women Fleeing Domestic Violence Can Now Receive A One-Off Support Payment

It’s been labelled the shadow pandemic and the fact remains that for many women across Australia, domestic violence is a lived reality that doesn’t discriminate by age, occupation, or socio-economic status. Researchers have found that during Covid-19 lockdowns, there was a surge in family and domestic violence, with agencies experiencing a surge in demand as nearly half their clients reported an increase in controlling behaviours. 

As many who have lived through such turmoil and trauma can attest, the roadmap to fleeing such situations at home can be fraught with challenges and extremely difficult to navigate, particularly when such bureaucracy makes it even harder. Now, it’s been announced that women fleeing a violent relationship will be given a one-off $5,000 payment as part of a federal government trial scheme. 

Known as the “escaping violence payment scheme,” the government has set aside $144.5 million over the next two years to give women $1,500 cash, with the remainder to pay for goods and services, bond, school fees and other necessaries to establish a new safe home. UnitingCare Network will be tasked with delivering the payments while helping link women and their children with relevant community services. 

As the Daily Telegraph reports, “An analysis of domestic violence data by the Australian Bureau of Statistics shows that while it is more common for women from poorer areas, women from high socio-economic areas are not immune from experiencing partner violence.”

As Women’s Safety Minister Anne Ruston explained, the trial has been introduced with the aim to help women overcome the financial barriers that might deter them from leaving a violent relationship. “We know that financial hardship as well as economic abuse - which may involve interfering with work or controlling or withholding money - reduces women’s ability to acquire and use money and makes it difficult to leave violent relationships,” she said. 

“The payments will assist people who need financial support to leave. We know the size of the house a woman is fleeing doesn’t matter. Often she bundles the kids into the car, maybe the dog too and they leave with nothing more than the clothes on their backs.”

To be eligible for a payment, women must be facing financial stress and have some evidence of domestic violence such as a referral from a family and domestic violence service provider with a risk assessment and safety plan, or an AVO, court order or police report. As UnitingCare Australia National Director Claerwen Little said, “We believe that all people, especially women and their children, have the right to live freely and without fear, and this payment is an important step forward to ending violence against women and children.”

If you require immediate assistance, please call 000.

If you’d like to speak to someone about domestic violence, please call the 1800 

Respect hotline on 1800 737 732 or chat online. 

Under 25? You can reach Kids Helpline at 1800 55 1800 or chat online.