This Is How Long Most People Are Waiting To Have Sex Now

Here’s how you thought dating worked in 2017: You swiped right on a guy, talked to him for a little while, and before you know it you were making plans to Netflix and Chill. Sex didn’t exactly have to happen, but it usually did. Now, forget everything you thought you knew, because it turns out […]

by | Sep 19, 2017

Here’s how you thought dating worked in 2017: You swiped right on a guy, talked to him for a little while, and before you know it you were making plans to Netflix and Chill.

Sex didn’t exactly have to happen, but it usually did. Now, forget everything you thought you knew, because it turns out that the casual hookup may be a thing of the past. A new survey’s found that everyone’s waiting longer to have sex.

In a poll of 2,000 adults, Groupon found that the average person will wait eight dates until they take their new relationship to the next level. When the results were split even further between men and women, Groupon found that men feel sex is okay at any point after the fifth date (although nine times more men than women thought having sex on the first date is okay), but women would rather wait until date nine.

The survey addressed other aspects of dating as well. For example, if you want to plan the perfect first date, 74 percent of Groupon’s respondents said the best activities are dinner and a movie, grabbing drinks at a bar, or getting coffee.

RELATED: This Is The Best First Date Idea That Will Help You Land A Second

Couple bar

Getty

But make an effort to get to know your date before you start suggesting places to go. Nearly 1 in 10 people have turned down a date because they didn’t like the suggested restaurant. And if and when you do make it out, keep in mind that almost one-third of people were turned off when their date told them what to order or ate off their plate.

On average, it takes about five dates before people decide on whether or not they want to see someone exclusively. So to make sure you land date number two (not to mention the dates after that), there are a few other helpful things you can do.

Research suggests that making him laugh is key, since it’s a sign of intelligence and creativity. Good hygiene, treating your waiter or waitress well, and paying attention to him are other surefire ways to ensure he’ll want to see you again. And, according to Groupon, random compliments and heart-to-hearts definitely don’t hurt either.

This article originally appeared on Men’s Health US. 

RELATED: This Is How Long A Couple Usually Dates For Before Moving In Together, Says Research

Recommended to you

Women Fleeing Domestic Violence Can Now Receive A One-Off Support Payment

It’s been labelled the shadow pandemic and the fact remains that for many women across Australia, domestic violence is a lived reality that doesn’t discriminate by age, occupation, or socio-economic status. Researchers have found that during Covid-19 lockdowns, there was a surge in family and domestic violence, with agencies experiencing a surge in demand as nearly half their clients reported an increase in controlling behaviours. 

As many who have lived through such turmoil and trauma can attest, the roadmap to fleeing such situations at home can be fraught with challenges and extremely difficult to navigate, particularly when such bureaucracy makes it even harder. Now, it’s been announced that women fleeing a violent relationship will be given a one-off $5,000 payment as part of a federal government trial scheme. 

Known as the “escaping violence payment scheme,” the government has set aside $144.5 million over the next two years to give women $1,500 cash, with the remainder to pay for goods and services, bond, school fees and other necessaries to establish a new safe home. UnitingCare Network will be tasked with delivering the payments while helping link women and their children with relevant community services. 

As the Daily Telegraph reports, “An analysis of domestic violence data by the Australian Bureau of Statistics shows that while it is more common for women from poorer areas, women from high socio-economic areas are not immune from experiencing partner violence.”

As Women’s Safety Minister Anne Ruston explained, the trial has been introduced with the aim to help women overcome the financial barriers that might deter them from leaving a violent relationship. “We know that financial hardship as well as economic abuse - which may involve interfering with work or controlling or withholding money - reduces women’s ability to acquire and use money and makes it difficult to leave violent relationships,” she said. 

“The payments will assist people who need financial support to leave. We know the size of the house a woman is fleeing doesn’t matter. Often she bundles the kids into the car, maybe the dog too and they leave with nothing more than the clothes on their backs.”

To be eligible for a payment, women must be facing financial stress and have some evidence of domestic violence such as a referral from a family and domestic violence service provider with a risk assessment and safety plan, or an AVO, court order or police report. As UnitingCare Australia National Director Claerwen Little said, “We believe that all people, especially women and their children, have the right to live freely and without fear, and this payment is an important step forward to ending violence against women and children.”

If you require immediate assistance, please call 000.

If you’d like to speak to someone about domestic violence, please call the 1800 

Respect hotline on 1800 737 732 or chat online. 

Under 25? You can reach Kids Helpline at 1800 55 1800 or chat online.