The Internet Is Losing It Over The Contents Of Jessica Simpson’s Freezer

Got milk? Jessica Simpson does and it’s taken over her freezer. The designer posted a photo of her freezer jam-packed with bags of her breast milk all dated and ready to serve to the newest addition to her family, three-month-old Birdie Mae. Her caption? “I’m starting to think we should add breast milk to the […]

by | May 31, 2019

Got milk? Jessica Simpson does and it’s taken over her freezer.

The designer posted a photo of her freezer jam-packed with bags of her breast milk all dated and ready to serve to the newest addition to her family, three-month-old Birdie Mae. Her caption? “I’m starting to think we should add breast milk to the Jessica Simpson Collection ????”

While the designer might not actually sell the stuff (though she’d make BANK if she did), her fans are calling on her to donate any leftovers she might have to a milk bank to be distributed to infants in need.

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“Awesome!! If you don’t know, when you overproduce there are ways to donate leftovers!” one follower commented.

Others were simply in awe of how much this momma’s been able to produce for her baby girl:

“Holy milk momma! Great job.”

“You are the liquid gold queen!”

FYI, it’s totally cool for breast milk to chill in the freezer until you need it, according to the Office On Women’s Health. All you need to do is store it in bottles or breast milk storage bags, like the ones Jessica filled up, and mark them with the date the milk was expressed. (By the way, these are the exact breast milk storage bags Jessica’s using in this pic.) Pro tip: Store breast milk inside the freezer and not in the freezer door. Keeping it in the door will increase the odds that the milk thaws a bit every time the door is opened.

If you’re as impressed as Jessica’s fans are by the amount of breast milk she’s got stashed, you should know Jessica’s celebrating her milk-production abilities right there with you. Just last month, she commemorated a successful pumping session with an Instagram photo of a bottle she filled to the top. “This is what success feels like ????,” Jessica wrote for a caption.

Jessica gave birth to Birdie and in March and, after a pretty rough pregnancy filled with broken toilet seats, swollen feet, and bronchitis, postpartum life seems to be loaded with rewards for the momma of three… after all, it brought her a beautiful daughter.

As for whether all that milk will be going to Birdie is unclear, but one thing’s for sure: This baby girl’s got plenty of it stored away if she wants it.

This article originally appeared on Women’s Health US

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Women Fleeing Domestic Violence Can Now Receive A One-Off Support Payment

It’s been labelled the shadow pandemic and the fact remains that for many women across Australia, domestic violence is a lived reality that doesn’t discriminate by age, occupation, or socio-economic status. Researchers have found that during Covid-19 lockdowns, there was a surge in family and domestic violence, with agencies experiencing a surge in demand as nearly half their clients reported an increase in controlling behaviours. 

As many who have lived through such turmoil and trauma can attest, the roadmap to fleeing such situations at home can be fraught with challenges and extremely difficult to navigate, particularly when such bureaucracy makes it even harder. Now, it’s been announced that women fleeing a violent relationship will be given a one-off $5,000 payment as part of a federal government trial scheme. 

Known as the “escaping violence payment scheme,” the government has set aside $144.5 million over the next two years to give women $1,500 cash, with the remainder to pay for goods and services, bond, school fees and other necessaries to establish a new safe home. UnitingCare Network will be tasked with delivering the payments while helping link women and their children with relevant community services. 

As the Daily Telegraph reports, “An analysis of domestic violence data by the Australian Bureau of Statistics shows that while it is more common for women from poorer areas, women from high socio-economic areas are not immune from experiencing partner violence.”

As Women’s Safety Minister Anne Ruston explained, the trial has been introduced with the aim to help women overcome the financial barriers that might deter them from leaving a violent relationship. “We know that financial hardship as well as economic abuse - which may involve interfering with work or controlling or withholding money - reduces women’s ability to acquire and use money and makes it difficult to leave violent relationships,” she said. 

“The payments will assist people who need financial support to leave. We know the size of the house a woman is fleeing doesn’t matter. Often she bundles the kids into the car, maybe the dog too and they leave with nothing more than the clothes on their backs.”

To be eligible for a payment, women must be facing financial stress and have some evidence of domestic violence such as a referral from a family and domestic violence service provider with a risk assessment and safety plan, or an AVO, court order or police report. As UnitingCare Australia National Director Claerwen Little said, “We believe that all people, especially women and their children, have the right to live freely and without fear, and this payment is an important step forward to ending violence against women and children.”

If you require immediate assistance, please call 000.

If you’d like to speak to someone about domestic violence, please call the 1800 

Respect hotline on 1800 737 732 or chat online. 

Under 25? You can reach Kids Helpline at 1800 55 1800 or chat online.