Filling Your House With Plants Increases Joy And Life Expectancy, Study Says

by | Jun 27, 2019

It’s no secret that women are prone to stress. The good news is there is one surprising solution that will not only make you feel better but will make your house feel like a calming oasis too. Indoor plants!

The craze of indoor plant’s has been the hottest trend for a while but who would have thought how many benefits there are to filling your home with leafy houseplants.

According to a study by Harvard University conducted over an eight year period found women who lived in areas with more greenery had a 12% lower mortality rate than those with less. The study also found there was improved mental health and higher social and physical activity!

One study discovered results that suggested interactions with indoor plants can reduce stress compared to hard mental work. While another found that participants were less anxious when in a workplace with indoor plants or windows with a view of nature.

If that’s not enough to convince you, there are plenty of other studies to suggest that the benefits of mental health are not only psychological.

RELATED: 5 Indoor Plants Guaranteed To Boost Your Wellbeing

Other benefits to having an abundance of indoor plants include air purification, better sleep and they also are great at blocking out noise!

Plants like the snake plant are perfect to have by your bedside as they are known to absorb hazardous chemicals during the day and emit clean, fresh air at night. Perfect for a good night’s sleep!  

Other plant’s such as rubber plants, spider plants and aloe vera are also exceptionally good at clearing the air in your home.

So, there’s all the evidence you need to convince yourself to go and buy yet another indoor plant!

Now you’ve just got to keep it alive.

RELATED: Adding This One Thing To Your Work Desk Reduces Your Chance Of Illness

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Your First Look At The Tour de France Femmes 2022 Route

For decades now, cyclists and their fans have been clambering for a women’s Tour de France. While the sport offers numerous events in the realm of road to gravel racing for female cyclists, they all tend to fall short to the kind of European stage race that has continued to attract the best competitors in the men’s field and, for those watching at home, left them inspired to purchase a bike and get outdoors. It’s safe to say that for many who aren’t even familiar with cycling, the Tour de France is well known. The event is bigger than the sport itself, having produced some of the most well known names in sport, even if controversy continues to surround them and the race itself which has long been plagued by doping scandals. Even so, the fact remains that few races possess the same kind of frantic energy, prestige and wonder as the Tour and not surprisingly, the sport’s female stars have fought for years to see a lasting, prestigious women’s stage race run alongside the men’s Tour. 

Earlier this year, it was confirmed that a women’s edition of the race will go ahead in 2022 that closely follows after the men’s race. According to Tour de France organiser, Christian Prudhomme, the women’s race will begin after the men’s Tour. As Prudhomme told The Guardian, “It will take place next year, that’s certain. It would have happened this year if it had not been for the Covid-19 pandemic, obviously, and above all if the Tokyo Olympics had not been after the [men’s] Tour, so the best riders may not be available. But the decision has been taken. There will be a Tour de France femmes in 2022 following closely after the [men’s] Tour.”

Now, the sport’s female athletes have been granted their first look at the 2022 race route which was recently unveiled in the Palais des Congres in Paris by newly appointed race director Marion Rousse. Even the unveiling was significant, with the elite women sitting alongside the peloton’s elite men in the Paris auditorium for the first time. It marks a shift in the landscape of cycling, one that puts women on an equal playing field as their male counterparts and signals a long-awaited leap in the profile of women’s cycling. Rousse described the “honour” of being the director of the women’s Tour de France, adding that: “The women’s races we have now are jewels to cherish.”

As the unveiling depicts, the women will begin on the Champs-Elysees before the route then zigzags east towards the Vosges Mountains and the Haut-Rhin, taking in sprint stages, gravel tracks that wind through the vineyards of Champagne, before ascending to high-altitudes in the final weekend. It will culminate in the 24 per cent gravel climb to Super Planche des Belles Filles. 

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“We wanted to start from Paris,” Rousse said of the women’s Tour. “With only eight stages, we couldn’t go down to the Alps or the Pyrenees, the transfers would be too long.” It was also announced that the women’s Tour de France champion would pocket a staggering 50,000 euro (approximately $78,190 AUD), with a further pot of $312,760 for Tour stage winners. 

Lizzie Deignan, winner of the inaugural women’s Paris-Roubaix this month, spoke of the announcement as being “an important day for cycling, not just women’s cycling.”

“It is a key indicator that the sport is still progressing as we are now able to compete in the most well-known bike race in the world. I think the organisers have done a really good job preparing the route for this edition.”

Deignan went on to add: “It will showcase the best that women’s cycling has to offer with a stage suited to every type of rider, something I was really hoping for. The route has been designed to offer entertaining racing from start to finish, but also to reach a crescendo with the final stage finishing on the Super Planche des Belles Filles, one of the hardest climbs in professional cycling.”