The Foods You Need To Help Fight PMS

by | Mar 22, 2018

PMS has a bad reputation with very good reason. Bloating, headaches, moodiness—even if you don’t experience them all, it only takes one symptom to throw off your whole day. But there are actually a ton of foods that can provide you with healthy nutrients and help alleviate some of your PMS symptoms. Get ready to put Mother Nature in her place by satisfying your cravings and conquering your symptoms at the same time: 

 

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Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, and Artichokes
It seems counterintuitive to conquer menstrual bloating with fiber, which is known to fill you up, but high-fiber veggies can actually ease bloating. Their high water content help push things along and rid the puffiness, gas and discomfort. Stay away from salty and high-sodium foods, which have the opposite effect of what you’re looking for. That bag of chips will only prolong your swollen suffering.

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Wheat Berry, Quinoa, and Popcorn
Do you ever feel like you literally have ants in your pants while PMSing? Even the smallest things are so irritating you could just crawl out of your skin? Alleviate your short temper with complex carbohydrates. These boost serotonin, the feel-good hormone. They also provide a steady supply of energy so that you don’t feel ravenous an hour later. Plus, one study from the Archives of Internal Medicine found that people on a low-carb diet were more likely to feel depressed, anxious, or angry than those who consumed whole grain each day. So if you’re looking for a mood-boosting food, complex carbs are your best bet.

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Grilled Salmon, Fortified Eggs, and Chia Seeds
If your period also brings a case of the blues along monthly, add a dose of omega-3s. These little fatty acids can also boost your mood. In fact, research from Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital found that omega-3s are so powerful, they may even function like an antidepressant. Grilled salmon, fortified eggs, and chia seeds are all great sources to keep the menstrual blues at bay. Keep in mind that you might want to steer clear of cocktails if you’re feeling like a downer, as alcohol acts as a depressant and may exacerbate your feelings of sadness.

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Bananas
Sleep disturbances right before your period are the norm for many women. Plus, experts at John Hopkins University in Baltimore found that too little sleep made women more susceptible to pain (meaning those cramps will feel even worse). So make sure to get your z’s by eating bananas, which contain melatonin—a sleep-aid hormone that’s released at night and helps regulate our body’s natural rhythms.

Lean Beef, Turkey, and Chicken
Feeling incredibly lethargic? Vitamin B12, found in lean meats, provides energy to fight that sluggish feeling. Plus, the protein in meat will help you stay alert.

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Kale, Spinach, and Romaine 
Hormonal acne is one of the most annoying side effects of PMS. Fight it with dark green leafy veggies, which are good sources of vitamin A. This fat-soluble vitamin fights dry skin and acne and blocks UV radiation (though you still need your sunscreen). 

Pumpkin Seeds
If you’re often plagued with headaches before or during your period, magnesium can help. The nutrient has been found to help relax blood vessels, which can alleviate your headache. Bake some pumpkin seeds or sauté a side of spinach with coconut oil and garlic to up your intake. 

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Eggs
Those PMS cravings are no joke. But the best defense is a good offense: Stay ahead of your hunger! That means starting your day off with a breakfast that is rich in protein and healthy fats. An energy omelet will help you start off your day right so you feel satisfied and energized. Scramble one whole egg with two egg whites, a half a cup of cottage cheese and two ounces of turkey. You’ll be so full of satisfying and nutrient-dense deliciousness that you can fight off any craving.

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Women Fleeing Domestic Violence Can Now Receive A One-Off Support Payment

It’s been labelled the shadow pandemic and the fact remains that for many women across Australia, domestic violence is a lived reality that doesn’t discriminate by age, occupation, or socio-economic status. Researchers have found that during Covid-19 lockdowns, there was a surge in family and domestic violence, with agencies experiencing a surge in demand as nearly half their clients reported an increase in controlling behaviours. 

As many who have lived through such turmoil and trauma can attest, the roadmap to fleeing such situations at home can be fraught with challenges and extremely difficult to navigate, particularly when such bureaucracy makes it even harder. Now, it’s been announced that women fleeing a violent relationship will be given a one-off $5,000 payment as part of a federal government trial scheme. 

Known as the “escaping violence payment scheme,” the government has set aside $144.5 million over the next two years to give women $1,500 cash, with the remainder to pay for goods and services, bond, school fees and other necessaries to establish a new safe home. UnitingCare Network will be tasked with delivering the payments while helping link women and their children with relevant community services. 

As the Daily Telegraph reports, “An analysis of domestic violence data by the Australian Bureau of Statistics shows that while it is more common for women from poorer areas, women from high socio-economic areas are not immune from experiencing partner violence.”

As Women’s Safety Minister Anne Ruston explained, the trial has been introduced with the aim to help women overcome the financial barriers that might deter them from leaving a violent relationship. “We know that financial hardship as well as economic abuse - which may involve interfering with work or controlling or withholding money - reduces women’s ability to acquire and use money and makes it difficult to leave violent relationships,” she said. 

“The payments will assist people who need financial support to leave. We know the size of the house a woman is fleeing doesn’t matter. Often she bundles the kids into the car, maybe the dog too and they leave with nothing more than the clothes on their backs.”

To be eligible for a payment, women must be facing financial stress and have some evidence of domestic violence such as a referral from a family and domestic violence service provider with a risk assessment and safety plan, or an AVO, court order or police report. As UnitingCare Australia National Director Claerwen Little said, “We believe that all people, especially women and their children, have the right to live freely and without fear, and this payment is an important step forward to ending violence against women and children.”

If you require immediate assistance, please call 000.

If you’d like to speak to someone about domestic violence, please call the 1800 

Respect hotline on 1800 737 732 or chat online. 

Under 25? You can reach Kids Helpline at 1800 55 1800 or chat online.