How To Know If You Qualify For Coronavirus Testing

How To Know If You Qualify For Coronavirus Testing

RELATED: ‘Stay Home For Us’ Is The Viral Message From Healthcare Workers We Need To Listen To Victoria: Anyone with a fever, shortness of breath, cough or sore throat can now be tested for coronavirus. There are currently 40 clinics across the state where this can be done, although GPs are also equipped to carry out […]

by | Aug 27, 2020

RELATED: ‘Stay Home For Us’ Is The Viral Message From Healthcare Workers We Need To Listen To

Victoria:

Anyone with a fever, shortness of breath, cough or sore throat can now be tested for coronavirus. There are currently 40 clinics across the state where this can be done, although GPs are also equipped to carry out tests.

South Australia:

In SA, testing is available to anybody with mild symptoms, including a cough, sore throat, runny nose, fever or shortness of breath. In total, there are four testing clinics in Adelaide and nine across regional South Australia, although drive-through clinics are also in operation. 

New South Wales:

Anyone experiencing symptoms is encouraged to get tested in areas where there are clusters of cases obtained through community-to-community transmission. These areas include: Waverley, Woollahra and Randwick, Ryde, Penrith, Blacktown, Manly, Dee Why, Liverpool, Westmead, Cumberland, Macquarie Park, Broken Hill, Nowra, Byron Bay, Port Macquarie and the Manning Valley.

Queensland: 

Those who have recently travelled abroad or “work in vulnerable settings such as healthcare, aged or residential care, military, a school or child care, correction facilities, detention centres and boarding schools” are now eligible to be tested across QLD. This also extends to people who experience mild symptoms and those who live in certain areas, including parts of Brisbane, the Gold Coast, Cairns and Palm Cove, Mareeba, Gordonvale or a First Nations community.

Tasmania: 

As per Tasmania’s Health Department website, those who think they “might have COVID-19 because [they] feel unwell with a fever or cough, sore throat or shortness of breath and have recently travelled internationally or interstate” are urged to get tested.

Western Australia:

The testing criteria in WA applies to those who present “with a fever above 38C, (have) a recent history of a fever (e.g. night sweats, chills) or an acute respiratory infection including shortness of breath, cough, sore throat.” These people are not required to have travelled interstate or overseas or have been in contact with a confirmed case.

Northern Territory:

Residents of the NT can be tested if:

– They have returned from interstate or overseas in the past 14 days and develop a respiratory illness (with or without fever).

– They have come into contact with a confirmed COVID-19 case in the past 14 days and develop a respiratory illness (with or without fever).

– They have severe community-acquired pneumonia of which there is no clear cause.

– They display signs of respiratory illness and are a healthcare worker who works directly with patients or a frontline worker, including the police, emergency workers, educators, retail pharmacists and disability workers.

Australian Capitan Territory:

Residents of the ACT can be tested if:

– They have returned from interstate or overseas in the past 14 days and develop a respiratory illness (with or without fever).

– They have come into contact with a confirmed COVID-19 case in the past 14 days and develop a respiratory illness (with or without fever).

– They have severe community-acquired pneumonia of which there is no clear cause.

– They display signs of respiratory illness and are a healthcare worker who works directly with patients or a frontline worker, including the police, emergency workers, educators, retail pharmacists and disability workers.

– They live in a high-risk setting, such as aged care, the military or correctional facilities and have symptoms of COVID-19.

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Previously, country-wide testing was limited to those who had flu-like symptoms, had recently returned from overseas or had come into contact with someone who had received a positive diagnosis. Then, on the 25th March, this was expanded to include health or aged care workers and those in identified hotspots and high-risk settings who were suffering from a fever or acute respiratory symptoms. At the time, the PM defined the term ‘high-risk settings’ included detention centres, rural and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, correctional facilities, boarding schools and military bases that have live-in accommodation. The National Cabinet also agreed that testing would be expanded to include hospitalised patients with fever and acute respiratory symptoms of unknown cause, at the discretion of the treating clinician.

If you think you might have contracted COVID-19, the Australian health authorities have set up a dedicated coronavirus advice line on 1800 020 080. They will advise you on how best to get tested and limit your potential risk of spread to others

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