3 Healthy Breakfast Recipes For Every Morning Mood - Women's Health

3 Healthy Breakfast Recipes For Every Morning Mood

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While researchers are still battling it out over whether skipping breakfast is as bad for your health and weight as previously thought, we say, why take the risk? Especially when you can feast on a morning meal as scrumptious as these three options, with hardly time taken out of your morning to prep them.

Coursety of Australian nutritionist and naturopath Kelly Healey’s first book, Eat for Life, no matter what mood you’re in, one of these are bound to get you to rise and shine.

Healthy Pancakes

Makes: 3-4

Preparation time: 10-12 minutes

Ingredients

1 egg

100 g (31⁄2 oz/1 cup) rolled oats

250 ml (81⁄2 fl oz/1 cup) almond or soy milk

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 banana

2 teaspoons ground cinnamon, plus extra to serve

coconut oil, for frying

maple syrup, to serve

Greek yoghurt, to serve

Method

1. Blend all the ingredients in a blender until smooth.

2. Heat a non-stick frying pan over a medium heat and spray with coconut oil.

3. Working in batches, pour 1 small ladleful of the batter into the pan and cook for 2–3 minutes on each side until bubbles form and the edges are set. Serve with fresh sliced banana, a sprinkle of cinnamon, maple syrup and yoghurt.

Kelly says: These pancakes are delicious, fluffy and very easy to make.

Kelly’s nutritional tip: Eating rolled oats in the morning helps to balance your blood sugar levels over the day ahead. One cup of oats contains 4 g (1⁄4 oz) fibre, around a fifth of your daily fibre requirements.

Sweet Potato, Zucchini & Haloumi Rosti

Serves: 4

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Ingredients

250 g (9 oz) sweet potato, peeled and grated

1 small zucchini (courgettes), grated

200 g (7 oz) haloumi, grated

1 large handful chopped flat-leaf (Italian) parsley

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 egg yolk

3 whole eggs

2 tablespoons cornflour (cornstarch)

To serve

roasted tomatoes

roasted portobello mushrooms

poached eggs

avocado

Method

1. Mix the grated sweet potato, zucchini and haloumi together in a large bowl. Add the chopped parsley, salt and pepper to the bowl and mix again, then stir in the egg yolk and the whole eggs together with the cornflflflour to form a batter.

2. Spray a hot frying pan with a little olive oil. Add a quarter of the rosti mixture to the hot pan and cook for roughly 5 minutes on each side, or until lightly golden.

3. Divide the rosti among plates and serve with poached eggs, roasted tomatoes, portobello mushrooms and sliced avocado.

Kelly says: I love fritters of all kinds, and these rosti are no different. Adding the haloumi helps to bind the rosti together and makes them extra creamy.

Kelly’s nutritional tip: Zucchini is a low-carb vegetable that is also high in fibre and rich in vitamin C, giving it great immune-boosting properties.

 

Homemade Muesli

Serves: 10-12

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Ingredients

400 g (14 oz/4 cups) rolled oats

70 g (21⁄2 oz/1⁄2 cup) pepitas (pumpkin seeds)

60 g (2 oz/1⁄2 cup) sunflower seeds

60 g (2 oz/1⁄2 cup) slivered or flaked almonds, toasted

50 g (13⁄4 oz/1⁄2 cup) walnuts halves, toasted

2 tablespoons whole flaxseed

55 g (2 oz/1 cup) coconut flakes

60 g (2 oz/1⁄2 cup) dried cranberries

60 g (2 oz/1⁄2 cup) raisins

2 tablespoons ground cinnamon

Method

1. Mix all the ingredients together in a large bowl.

2. Store in an airtight container. It will keep for several weeks if stored in an airtight container away from heat or sunlight. Serve with fresh berries and Greek yoghurt as you desire.

Kelly says: I love to make my own muesli as you can add your own combination of nuts and seeds to really make it work for you. You’ll see I’ve added quite a lot of cinnamon here and that’s no mistake – it’s great for indigestion, boosts the metabolism (which will help with weight loss) and tastes fantastic, too.

Kelly’s nutritional tip: I like adding pumpkin seeds to my muesli as they can help to lower blood sugar levels as well as being high in fibre and magnesium, making them great for bowel health.

By Nikolina Ilic

Nikolina is the web-obsessed Digital Editor at Men's and Women's Health, responsible for all things social media and .com. A lover of boxing, she spends most of the time in the gym or with her husband and daughter. She was previously a Digital Editor at GQ and Vogue magazine.

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